New article: Configuring Emacs

October 24th, 2013

I just published my Emacs configuration as an article. Contains interesting stuff on Emacs, OrgMode, Clojure and other things.

New zeekat website design

May 9th, 2013

This week, I re-implemented my main website. The text on the old one needed to be revised heavily (in fact I removed almost all of it except a short bio and some longer articles) and I wanted to experiment with a more colorful look. I need to revise the stylesheet a bit more to give a better experience on small screens (mobile), but so far I’m pleased with the result.

The new site html is generated completely by emacs’ org-mode project publishing functionality (the old one used a custom bunch of perl scripts generating from HTML snippets and perl POD documents). This hopefully means it’ll be easier to add and revise content, and it also provides nice syntax highlighting for any code snippets I put in my articles.

The whole switchover was pretty smooth, especially once I wrote a bit of elisp to roughly prepare conversion from POD formatting to org:


(defun pod2org
(point mark)
"Rougly convert region from pod syntax to org-mode"
(interactive "r")
(replace-regexp "C<\\([^>]+\\)>" "=\\1=" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "I<\\([^>]+\\)>" "/\\1/" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "B<\\([^>]+\\)>" "*\\1*" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "^=head1 \\(.*\\)" "* \\1" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "^=head2 \\(.*\\)" "** \\1" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "^=head3 \\(.*\\)" "*** \\1" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "^=head4 \\(.*\\)" "**** \\1" nil point mark)
(replace-regexp "^=head5 \\(.*\\)" "***** \\1" nil point mark))

Very basic, but pretty useful.

Now, I’m considering replacing WordPress for this blog with org-mode too. That probably requires a bit more investigation. I want to keep at least the tags/categories feature and related rss feeds, and I’m not sure if that’s available for org at the moment.

See the incredible emacs config.

November 3rd, 2012

Because people asked: my current emacs configuration is at https://github.com/joodie/emacs-config

Note that it will not work as is, as it depends on my local file tree and specific installs from marmalade. So it’s mostly useful as a raw bucket of references to interesting stuff. Oh, and it includes my personal color theme, which may be an interesting example of emacs 24′s new color-theme functionalities.

October Amsterdam Clojure this saturday

October 25th, 2012

This saturday, all day. I’ll be giving an updated version of my “functional clojure: sequences” talk in the morning.

Clojure-refactoring gets a little love, a new release and a new maintainer.

October 24th, 2011

clojure-refactoring, the Emacs/SLIME based toolkit for doing refactoring wasn’t getting enough love and attention, so I fixed a few things. Tom Crayford unfortunately doesn’t have the time to work on it any further so I’m taking over as the maintainer. Inspect the code at the new “official” repository.

For now, I’m focused on fixing parsing issues first, then installing ease (I’m thinking about packaging everything Emacs-related on marmalade but that depends on what’s the easiest way to get stuff integrated for the user on the Emacs and Clojure sides). I’ve already removed the dependencies on out-dated libraries. Basically, everything I need to make the current functionality reliable enough for production use. Next up is support for clojure 1.3, probably, if that needs any work (I’m running 1.2 in production everywhere for now).

For the further future, I’d like this code to be useful for other editors/APIs/tools, so the SLIME/swank/Emacs specific stuff probably has to be separated out at some point. Some more refactorings will also be useful.

For now, version 0.6.1 is on clojars. Get it while it’s hot.

Announcement: clj-authsub – AuthSub client in clojure

October 8th, 2011

AuthSub is the authorization API Google uses for many of its products, meaning you can use it to ask a user to provide access to their private youtube listings, calendar entries etc without forcing them to hand over their password. The protocol is actually pretty simple and implementing it using clj-http was straight forward, except for one thing: clj-http always puts the connection port number in the Host header (which by the way is completely valid according to the HTTP/1.1 spec), but some google applications (notably, youtube) do not like that, giving a crypic HTTP status 401 “AuthSub token has the wrong scope” error. Figuring out the problem took a couple of hours given that that idiosyncrasy is not documented anywhere and I had to figure it out from some comments in the Python client for AuthSub.

With that issue out of the way, I’ve released clj-authsub version 0.1.0. It’s minimal and currently doesn’t support signed/secure tokens, but it works.

Relatively sane conversion of PDFs to web-ready JPGs using ImageMagick.

September 15th, 2011

Some people when confronted with a problem, think “I know,
I’ll use ImageMagick.” Now they have two problems.
*

For one of the sites I’m maintaining a lot of content is generated directly from (more or less print-ready) PDFs. The only free tool I’ve been able to find that can convert PDFs to decent quality JPGs or PNGs is ImageMagick.

But even when you’ve got ImageMagick’s convert and mogrify commands installed, conversion of PDFs still requires some careful tuning, that is: careful selection of arguments to convert. Also; a sacrificial chicken and lots of patience. Anyway, here’s what I ended up with. Most of this is also available in my clj-imajine clojure library.

Color space.

Many web browsers do not support any color space other than RGB/sRGB. If your PDFs are in the CMYK color space (usual for print) or any other color space, the resulting JPGs will look “weird” in many applications and web browsers; some viewers just show a blank image and others completely mess up the colors. To make sure the end result is in sRGB, use the option “-colorspace sRGB“.

Color depth.

For much the same reasons, you want to enforce that the output color depth is 8 bits for JPGs. To do that, use the option “-depth 8“.

Crop boxes.

PDFs are pretty complex documents and one potential pitfall is that there are at least 3 different indicators of the “boundaries” of the PDF. I’ve run into a few where the “right” boundaries were provided by the “cropbox” instead of the “media box”. This post by Joseph Scott provided the solution: use “-define pdf:use-cropbox=true“.

The final line becomes:

convert -define pdf:use-cropbox=true -colorspace sRGB -depth 8 pages.pdf pages.jpg

Note that if your PDF contains more than one page, this will generate a JPG for each one, named pages1.jpg, pages2.jpg etc… To select a single page you can use convert -define pdf:use-cropbox=true -colorspace sRGB -depth 8 pages.pdf[X] pages.jpg where X is the page number minus 1. You can find the page numbers in a PDF using ImageMagick’s identify command like this: identify -density 2 -format "%p," pages.pdf

*) paraphrased from Jamie Zawinski’s remark on regular expressions.

Announcement: pretzel – clojure predicate functions

April 5th, 2011

I’m working on pretzel right now. It’s a basic library that can be used to combine predicates and also holds a bunch of tests on string content.

Code and documentation is on github.

Announcement: flutter-decline-demo – validation and form generation on compojure

April 2nd, 2011

Some people indicated they wanted some example code for my clj-decline
(validation) and flutter (form generation) libraries. So today I wrote
a simple demo application that uses both.

Get the code at github.

Announcement: flutter – clojure / hiccup form fields

March 26th, 2011

I’ve been working on flutter, a library for saner form generation today. First (pretty basic) release was done on clojars. Still working on many details, including more-or-less full-coverage tests.

Get the code on github.

Also see the announcement on the clojure group.